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For Researchers

Survey of the Health of Wisconsin charts and dataThe Survey of the Health of Wisconsin is an annual survey of the health status and health needs of the Wisconsin population AND a health research infrastructure, executing many different projects for agencies and researchers from around the world.

 

 

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SHOW’s Research Services

  • We can provide research services
  • We can manage recruitment and screening
  • Add your own questions
  • We can collect specialized biosamples
  • We can help with IRB, protocols or grants
  • Over 20 studies completed or ongoing

One part of SHOW’s mission is to help conduct research for outside groups and organizations. SHOW’s experienced and cost effective team can help make your research possible.

 

View the brochure for researchers. (pdf) The brochure describes research services SHOW can provide and information about SHOW’s data and biorepository.

 

Connect with us today at researchers@show.wisc.edu or call to begin your inquiry. We are always glad to share ideas.

 

SHOW Research Services

Research Project Coordination

 

SHOW’s project management and central coordination can help make your research possible. SHOW’s team is already up and running at the UW, and is cost-effective infrastructure available for inquiries from any organizations. SHOW can serve as a hub for standardized data collection and centralized data management and reporting. SHOW frequently serves as a coordinating center, managing the design, implementation, and analysis and playing a critical role in communication and quality control for research studies.

 

Collection of Environmental and Biological Specimens

 

SHOW has field resources to collect environmental samples in homes or other facilities and can coordinate analyses at specialized laboratories. We are expert at developing protocols for collecting, transporting, storing, and documenting physical examination data, biologic specimens, and environmental samples.

 

Add or Compare with SHOW Core Survey

 

You can also build your research into SHOW’s annual survey cycle and routine. Groups can add questions or questionnaires, physical measurements, environmental measurements, biological sample collection. It may also make sense for a group to recruit additional participants within the SHOW annual survey paradigm.

 

SHOW’s annual survey data can help to strengthen your research. SHOW has collected baseline data on the health of residents since 2008. You may stretch your research power by adding variables from SHOW’s routine data collection.

 

Grants, Protocols, IRB, Human Subjects Protection

 

SHOW can help you to prepare your research for IRB submission. (IRB) ensures protection of the rights and welfare of respondents in studies by reviewing and approving any research activity involving human subjects. We have developed innovative techniques to keep participant data and identity confidential.

 

Grants, Protocols, Publications

 

SHOW has many experts on staff to help you with most any aspect of grant submissions and management, protocol development and ideas for publications and distribution of findings.

 

Examples of Research Projects

 

SHOW has conducted over 20 outside studies for researchers to date. View highlights of the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin's recent research partnerships.

 

SHOW’s Annual Survey

  • More than 6,000 participants, adults and children
  • In-person interviews with 2,000 questions
  • Objective measures of weight, blood pressure, activity and more
  • Biorepository with plasma, urine and cheek swabs
  • Measures of environmental data, social and built environment
  • Data is available for communities and researchers

SHOW data is available for research studies and public health inquiries. SHOW has been collecting health information from representative sample of the state population, in annual survey cycles, since 2008. SHOW’s cohort is made up of all ages. SHOW collects over 4,000 variables on each adult subject, completes a brief physical exam, observes eight days of accelerometry and takes a variety of biological specimens for some immediate analysis and long-term storage for future research.

 

SHOW Publications

SHOW Cohort

SHOW’s cohort is designed to be a representative sample of the population of the state of Wisconsin. SHOW’s employs household recruitment for the fullest possible representation of residents of the state. Currently the SHOW cohort is 6,000 and growing.

For more in depth information about SHOW’s cohort please touch base with our data team, researchers@show.wisc.edu.

SHOW Questionnaires

SHOW collects over 4,000 variables on each adult participant in the survey and more limited questionnaires for children participants. The following list covers the range of topics in SHOW questionnaires.

 

Full information about questionnaires, variables, codebooks and some data charts from SHOW are available at show.wisc.edu/data/. A brief auto-access registration is required.

 

* Some topics are not collected each year. Fewer topics are collected from children.

 

Health-Related Behaviors

  • Alcohol use
  • Accelerometry (exercise and physical activity) and self-reported physical activity
  • Body Measures (BMI, waist circumference, weight, height) and weight history
  • Bioimpedance (body composition)
  • Contraception use
  • Diet
  • Preventative health (e.g. influenza vaccine use)
  • Reproductive Health
  • Screen Time
  • Sexual Behavior
  • Sleep
  • Smoking
  • Caregiving

Sociodemographics

  • County and neighborhood
  • Demographics (age, gender, race/ethnicity, etc)
  • Education
  • Health Literacy
  • Military Experience
  • Occupation

Health Care

  • Health Insurance and health care access
  • Prescription Medication

Health Conditions/Outcomes

 

Physical

  • Cardiovascular
  • Diabetes
  • Oral Health
  • Cognitive Function
  • Respiratory Health/Spirometry
  • Quality of Life (physical)

Mental

  • Depression
  • PTSD
  • Quality of Life (mental)
  • Stress

Environment

  • Built Environment
  • Economic Hardship
  • Discrimination
  • Food Insecurity
  • Sense of Community
  • Stressful Events
  • Foreclosures
  • Groundwater
  • Housing

SHOW Physical Measurements

The Survey of the Health of Wisconsin records objective physical measurements. These include:

 

For adults:

  • Blood pressure and heart rate
  • Anthropometry: measuring height, weight, waist, hip and arm circumference
  • Respiratory function using a portable peak flow meter
  • Actigraph: participants wear non-invasive device, which measures rest/activity cycles for eight days
  • Bioimpediance Analysis: for years 2008-2013

For children:

  • 3-6 years: height, weight
  • 6 years and up: height, weight, actigraph, blood pressure, respiratory function, waist, hip and arm circumference

SHOW Biospecimen Program

Developed to address future medical, environmental, and public health issues, SHOW’s stored biospecimen program is a collection of serum, plasma, urine, and DNA specimens that are readily available and can be used by researchers. SHOW also has measures of blood chemistry analysed: CBC, lipid panels and cholesterol.

 

SHOW currently collects the following samples from Adult Participants:

  • Blood (DNA, serum, and plasma) and urine samples are aliquoted in small samples and stored in freezers at -80ºC in a central biorepository.
  • Blood samples – Immediate analysis provides information on participant’s blood cell counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet count, hemoglobin A1C, glucose, creatinine, total and HDL cholesterol.
  • Urine samples – Collected and stored for future use.
  • DNA – Obtained from whole blood (or alternatively from saliva sample in participants who refuse a blood draw) that can be used for genetic research.

Using SHOW’s biospecimens: To learn more about using SHOW’s biological specimens for your research work, contact us at researchers@show.wisc.edu, or call (888) 433-7469.

SHOW Environmental Measurements

The annual SHOW survey collects a number of measures of the environment. Additionally, our research services can collect many different measures for other research studies.

 

SHOW’s core survey is designed to capture a number of environmental measures:

 

1) The SHOW biorepository provides storage and distribution of aliquoted serum, plasma and urine samples as well as extracted and stored DNA samples for each subject for research purposes and establishes procedures that ensure adherence to human subject ethical review, confidentiality, quality, safety and other regulatory standards and best practices.

2) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping technology is used to link SHOW household data to various sources of contextual data on the social, build, and nutritional environment.

  • Census block group, tract, and county
  • Census & RUCA urban and rural classifications
  • Health region
  • County health rankings
  • Traffic use/density, air quality
  • Density of food stores or fast food restaurants
  • Proximity to parks, trails, clinics
  • Residence/work address walkability score

3) Trained surveyors use audit tools for direct observation of the quality of the built environment. These measures have been taken in limited numbers of SHOW cohort and years.

  • WASABE — Objective checklist of quality of built environment in 400 m street buffer around household (incl. aesthetics, walkability, connectivity)
  • NEMS — Survey of access/quality/pricing of healthy foods in local food stores and restaurants

4) Environmental exposure data can also be found among many other SHOW variables collected from survey questions including information on diet, household characteristics, and perceptions on the quality of the local environment (access to healthy food, physical activity, and safety).

  • Great Lakes fish consumption
  • Fast food, grocery store, farmer’s market, garden use
  • Consumption of specific grains, produce, meats, and processed foods, and desserts
  • Perceived walking distance from park, grocery store, school, library, pharmacy, fitness center, fast food, work
  • Perceived greenspace, privacy, safety in neighborhood
  • Water filter use and type
  • Drinking water source: municipal or private well
  • Indoor pets and type
  • Indoor and outdoor chemical use
  • Access to public transit, healthcare, recreational activities

Environmental Studies SHOW has Conducted for Outside Researchers

 

SHOW is designed to support ancillary studies. In conjunction with the thousands of variables of health information on SHOW participants, additional information can be collected to complete a research study (biological sample collection, follow-up surveys with more detailed exposure questions, well water sample collection, etc.). If you are interested in conducting an ancillary study with existing SHOW data or would like to collect additional data within SHOW please contact us today, data@show.wisc.edu, or (888) 433-7469. The table below highlights examples of ongoing or completed SHOW studies with an environmental focus.

 

Examples of Ongoing or Completed SHOW Ancillary Studies with Environmental Health Focus

 

Study

Collaborator(s)

Summary

Determinants of Vitamin D levels

Corinne Engelman, Population Health Sciences

Various assessments were used, including a food summary questionnaire, skin color measurement using an XRF machine, and blood serum testing of vitamin D levels. DNA was also collected for genetic testing to determine environmental predictors of vitamin D in a subsample of Wisconsin adults.

PBDE

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers were used to measure bromine levels in upholstered furnishings, bedding, vehicle interiors, and electronic devices. Vacuum cleaner contents, indoor air samples, and blood sera were analyzed for PBDE congeners using conventional gas chromatograph methods. Data collection was done by SHOW staff.

WASABE/NEMS

Population Health Sciences

 

The Wisconsin Assessment of the Social and Built Environment (WASABE) is an audit tool developed by researchers at UW-Madison to objectively assess the social and built environment in communities. WASABE was conducted around all 2010 SHOW households. While in neighborhoods to collect WASABE data, raters also completed the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey (NEMS) to determine the nutrition environment.

La Crosse County CPPW

La Crosse County Health Department

SHOW conducted a three-phase evaluation of the Get Active intervention, which was developed and implemented by the La Crosse Co Health Department. The evaluation consisted of a pre- and post-intervention mailed survey sent to a random sample of La Crosse Co residents. In addition, two environmental assessments were conducted in neighborhoods across the county (including the WASABE and NEMS surveys).

Anglers Study

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

Samples from SHOWs biorepository were used to explore levels of Omega 3-Fatty acids and Selenium in the SHOW study. SHOW staff travel to communities throughout Wisconsin to gather data from men age >50 who agree to participate in the study. Blood and biologic samples are collected and will be tested for mercury and PCB levels. Questionnaires assess angler’s current fish consumption patterns and knowledge regarding current fish advisory programs for Mercury and PCBS.

EPHT

Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking program

The EPHT program is a CDC funded program aimed at advancing environmental health surveillance nationwide to analyze urine samples from a representative population sample (the first of its kind ever conducted. The goals of this study are to assess the exposure of state residents to cadmium, arsenic (speciated), mercury and uranium and compare these distributions to levels found nationally.

Wisconsin Environmental Exposure Pilot Study (WEEPS)

Chris Bradfield, Molecular Environmental Toxicology Center

The study was conducted by SHOW in partnership with the Dr. Christopher Bradfield at the UW Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Laboratory. Former and current SHOW participants were recruited to provide blood and saliva samples to identify predictive and novel candidate biomarkers in mRNA and pilot test environmental exposure and biomarker data.

Wisconsin’s Assessment of Health Consumption of Great Lakes Fish

‘Anglers II’

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

This two-year project proposal seeks to design and implement a fish advisory intervention in clinics to facilitate individual dietary changes and corresponding reductions in exposure to toxic contaminants from consumption of Great Lakes fish among Lake Superior Basin residents. This project builds upon DHS’s current GLRI sport fish consumption project and experience gained in Minnesota addressing similar issues on the north shore of Lake Superior. This intervention will include training for health care providers, a patient screening tool to assess fish consumption, testing of hair for mercury content, screening for emerging toxicants, and education for participants and the general public.

Private Well Use and Risks

UW Population Health Sciences

Despite the facts that a) over 1/3 of the state’s residence are on private wells, b) private wells are vulnerable because they are not regularly monitored and treated and c) the state faces a number of known groundwater quality issues including arsenic and nitrate contamination - private well testing in Wisconsin is limited. The project will follow-up with SHOW participants to better understand facilitators and barriers to private well testing as a means to improve risk communication messages and develop future programs. The project includes survey development and a formative research phase, and data collection phase. Results will be shared with state regulatory partners.

Using SHOW's Data

The Survey of the Health of Wisconsin has been collecting data to inform Wisconsin public health research since 2008. The data and bio-samples that SHOW collects are made available to qualified researchers and organizations for efforts that aim to improve health in the state.

You can make a data request today. To begin, please begin your inquiry by emailing researchers@show.wisc.edu or calling us at (888) 433-7469.

 

More resources for data request:

Ancillary Studies

SHOW has conducted over 20 outside studies for researchers to date. It is part of SHOW’s core mission to serve as an infrastructure for executing outside research projects, sometimes as separate studies, sometimes added into the annual SHOW core survey. The brief table below outlines the studies that SHOW has completed to-date. If you are interested in learning more about how SHOW can help with your research, you can find more specifics in the “SHOW Research Services” tabs above, and we are always glad to talk with you personally, too. You can email us at researchers@show.wisc.edu, or start with a call to Tamara LeCaire at (608) 890-3846.

 

Study

Collaborator(s)

Summary

Past Studies

   

Vitamin D

Corinne Engelman, Population Health Sciences

Various assessments were used, including a food summary questionnaire, skin color measurement using an XRF machine, and blood serum testing of vitamin D levels. DNA was also collected for genetic testing to determine environmental predictors of vitamin D in a subsample of Wisconsin adults.

Caregiver Strain

And Cellular Aging

Whitney Witt, Population Health Sciences

This study determined the cross-sectional relationship between perceived caregiver stress and cellular aging among caregivers. The Caregiver study was completed in conjunction with SHOW core.

PBDE

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, US EPA

Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers were used to measure bromine levels in upholstered furnishings, bedding, vehicle interiors, and electronic devices. Vacuum cleaner contents, indoor air samples, and blood sera were analyzed for PBDE congeners using conventional gas chromatograph methods. Data collection was done by SHOW staff.

Oral Health

Wisconsin Division of Public Health

Over a two year period, a brief dental screening was performed on SHOW participants in conjunction with SHOW core. Data from approximately 1070 participants will be used to assess determinants of oral health in Wisconsin residents.

Wood County Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW)

Wood County Health Department, CDC

SHOW conducted a three-phase evaluation of the Get Active intervention which was developed and implemented by the Wood County Health Department. The evaluation consisted of a pre- a post-intervention mailed survey sent to a random sample of Wood County residents. In addition, Marshfield Clinics Research Foundation staff helped collect data through mini-SHOW developed in partnership with Wood County representatives as well as stakeholders at the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services.

La Crosse County CPPW

La Crosse County Health Department

SHOW conducted a three-phase evaluation of the Get Active intervention which was developed and implemented by the La Crosse County Health Department. The evaluation consisted of a pre- and post-intervention mailed survey sent to a random sample of La Crosse County residents. In addition, two environmental assessments were conducted in neighborhoods across the county. The Wisconsin Assessment of the Social and Built Environment (WASABE) and the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey (NEMS) were performed all over the county.

WASABE/NEMS

Ana Martinez-Donate, Population Health Sciences

Corinne Engelman, Population Health Sciences

The Wisconsin Assessment of the Social and Built Environment (WASABE) is an audit tool developed by researchers at UW-Madison to objectively assess the social and built environment in communities throughout Wisconsin. WASABE was conducted around all 2010 SHOW households. While in neighborhoods to collect WASABE data, raters also completed the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey (NEMS) to determine the nutrition environment in Wisconsin communities.

ANEWC

Ana Martinez-Donate, Population Health Sciences

 

In partnership with the Assessing the Nutrition Environment in Wisconsin Communities (ANEWC) project, SHOW conducted customer intercept interviews pre- and post-intervention in restaurants and food stores in Stevens Point and Waupaca, WI.

 

 

Recently Completed or Ongoing

Lindsay Heights

Lindsay Heights Neighborhood Alliance

ICTR

CCHE

The Lindsay Heights pilot study is a community-based participatory research project established through a partnership between the Lindsay Heights Neighborhood Health Alliance and SHOW. Participants were recruited from the Lindsay Heights neighborhood in Milwaukee, WI and those who agreed to participate completed a mini-SHOW, including questionnaires, body measurements, and venipuncture. Results from these data are being used to support an application to NIH through the UW ICTRs Collaborative Center for Health Equity (CCHE).

Great Lakes Anglers Study

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, US EPA

Samples from SHOWs biorepository were used to explore levels of Omega 3-Fatty acids and Selenium in the SHOW study. In addition SHOW staff travel to communities throughout Wisconsin to gather data from men age >50 who agree to participate in the study. Blood and biologic samples are collected and will be tested for mercury and PCB levels. Questionnaires assess angler’s current fish consumption patterns and knowledge regarding current fish advisory programs for Mercury and PCBS.

Community Transformation Grant

Various County Health departments around the state

SHOW will play a major evaluation role for tracking key health indicators in reducing statewide chronic disease rates. These rates will be reduced through tobacco control, obesity prevention and promoting physical activity in communities throughout the state of Wisconsin. In year one of the grant, SHOW will process baseline indicators and measures within the core survey, moving forwards in years 2-5 of the grant SHOW will also provide targeted community specific health assessment capacity for pilot award recipients. In 2012 over a 3 months period SHOW interview over 1300 state residents for six counties participating in this study.

WEEPS

Chris Bradfield, Molecular Environmental Toxicology Center

The Wisconsin Environmental Exposures Pilot Study (WEEPS) involves gathering mRNA from 60 SHOW participants and planning for additional sample collection and analyses to support the collaborative transdisciplinary research that will lead to a center focused on understanding human susceptibility and response to environmental exposures using in-vitro, animal and human studies.

EPHT

Wisconsin Environmental Public Health Tracking program

The EPHT program is a CDC funded program aimed at advancing environmental health surveillance nationwide to analyze urine samples from a representative sample of Wisconsin adults. To date, no other such study has been conducted on a population based sample. The primary goals of this study will be to assess the distribution in exposure of state residents to cadmium, arsenic (speciated), mercury and uranium and compare these distributions to levels found nationally.

Physical Activity Measurement Pilot

Kristen Malecki, Scott Strath, UW-Milwaukee

SHOW is working with partners at UW Milwaukee and within the Department of Kinesiology at UW-Madison to conduct a pilot feasibility study to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior amongst Wisconsin adults. The results of this study will be shared with colleagues at UW who are interested in exploring improved metrics for understanding physical activity measurement.

Wisconsin Environmental Exposure Pilot Study (WEEPS)

Chris Bradfield, Molecular Environmental Toxicology Center

WEEPS was conducted for preliminary work necessary to develop a state-of-the-art and novel Environmental Health Center at the University of Wisconsin. The study was conducted by SHOW in partnership with the Dr. Christopher Bradfield at the UW Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Laboratory. Former and current SHOW participants were recruited to provide blood and saliva samples to identify predictive and novel candidate biomarkers in mRNA and pilot test environmental exposure and biomarker data using saliva as a cost-effective and less-invasive method.

vizHOME

Patricia Brennan, UW College of Engineering

The purpose of this project is to systematically determine how household context shapes personal health information management (PHIM). PHIM encompasses a suite of cognitive and behavioral tasks that people undertake to accomplish their health goals, including: recording symptoms; communicating with clinicians; determining when and how to reorder medications; monitoring health states; and making sense of discharge summaries, health-related web sites and clinician-provided handouts. Knowledge of which features of the household context shape PHIM can be used to better design technologies for PHIM. Our long-term goal is to improve individuals’ self-management and health outcomes by accelerating the design and adoption of PHIM-supporting computer technologies that explicitly take into consideration features of the home context.

Wisconsin’s Assessment of Health Consumption of Great Lakes Fish

‘Anglers II’

Henry Anderson, Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services

This two-year project proposal seeks to design and implement a fish advisory intervention in clinics to facilitate individual dietary changes and corresponding reductions in exposure to toxic contaminants from consumption of Great Lakes fish among Lake Superior Basin residents. This project builds upon DHS’s current GLRI sport fish consumption project and experience gained in Minnesota addressing similar issues on the north shore of Lake Superior. This intervention will include training for health care providers, a patient screening tool to assess fish consumption, testing of hair for mercury content, screening for emerging toxicants, and education for participants and the general public.

Groundwater Research Project

Kristen Malecki, Wisconsin Groundwater Coordinating Council

Private well owners in the state of Wisconsin are at greatest risk for exposure to groundwater contamination because their water is unregulated. Private well testing is an evidence-based intervention that can help private well owners know if they have a groundwater quality problem and if they need to treat their wells. The Department of Natural Resources in Wisconsin estimates only 10% of private well-owners actually test their wells. Wisconsin private well owners represent approximately 1/3 of the population. The SHOW sample also includes approximately 1,000 residents on private wells (about 1/3 of the total SHOW sample). This project is a follow-up survey of private well owners regarding private well testing practices and barriers to private well testing. This study will support future health based risk assessments as well as identify possible solutions for improving private well testing rates in the state.

SHWAHP

Kevin Thao, UW Department of Family Medicine, Wausau Area Hmong Association, UW Stevens Point

This project is the Survey of the Health of Wasau Area Hmong Population. Dr. Kevin Thao from the Department of Family medicine is working with SHOW to design a community based assessment of health in the Hmong community. Seed funding (10,000$) for this pilot has been awarded by the Aspirus Health Foundation. Additional funding for the pilot is continued to be sought.

Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Risk of MetS (Hair Cortisol) Pilot

Leonelo Bautista and Alberto Palloni, UW Graduate School, Ctr for Demography Pilot Grant

This project will assess the usefulness of hair cortisol as a marker of chronic psychosocial stress (CPS), by quantifying its association with self-reported stress, individual and neighborhood SES, and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Data from this study will be used to design of a cohort study of the effects of SES on CPS and MetS in SHOW.

Sample Sets of SHOW Data and Charts

Survey of the Health of Wisconsin data and charts


For Researchers

Last updated: 06/05/2017
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