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Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families

The Wisconsin Partnership Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health seeks to reduce health disparities and improve the quality of life for all state residents. The Partnership Program’s Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families (LIHF) addresses one of the most perplexing disparities in Wisconsin – infant mortality.

 

This innovative community-academic collaboration is designed to improve local conditions that lead to healthier birth outcomes among African American families in Beloit, Kenosha, Milwaukee and Racine. These four cities in southeastern Wisconsin account for 90 percent of African American births in the state.

 

Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families in Action

 

Project grants awarded in 2013 focus on improving prenatal care, increasing family and community supports, and strengthening father involvement. As shown in the following videos, many already are making an impact on families in Beloit, Kenosha, Milwaukee and Racine.

 

Dr. Philip Farrell, dean emeritus of the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, played an integral role in creating the Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families through the Wisconsin Partnership Program.

To strengthen father involvement, Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Beloit provides pre-employment training and support for African American men age 18 to 30.

Healthy Families Kenosha is a nationally recognized home-visiting model program for new parents that provides child development, nutrition and service coordination to promote healthy babies and strong families.

Milwaukee’s No Longer an Island project seeks to develop a leadership and social support network that increases engagement among African American fathers and men through peer mentoring and community health navigators.

The Normalizing Breastfeeding project in Milwaukee seeks to increase breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity rates by providing support services to pregnant women, expectant fathers and new parents.

Through Racine’s Birthing Project, sister-friend volunteers are trained to mentor, nurture and support African American women from pregnancy through their child’s infancy.

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Click the thumbnails to watch each video.


Last updated: 11/12/2014
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