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Richard Chappell Appointed President of Society for Clinical Trials

Madison, Wisconsin - Dr. Richard Chappell, professor of biostatistics and medical informatics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH), has been appointed president of the Society for Clinical Trials (SCT).

 

Richard ChappellChappell, also a professor in the UW-Madison department of statistics, has been a statistician for numerous phase I, II and III clinical trials for the UW Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC), the Institute on Aging and other School of Medicine and Public Health investigators, as well as for private foundations and industry.

 

He is, or has been, a member of UW-Madison's Human Subjects Committee, the Carbone Cancer Center's Protocol Review Committee and the data and safety monitoring boards for 25 clinical trials.

 

A member of the FDA's Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee, he is a founding member and consulting statistician for the Hong Kong Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Study Group, for which he designed three multi-center clinical trials.

 

Chappell earned his doctoral and master's degrees in statistics at the University of Chicago. He will assume his new responsibilities at the Society for Clinical Trials, where he has served in many leadership roles, on May 18 at its annual meeting in Vancouver.

 

The Society for Clinical Trials is an international organization dedicated to the development and dissemination of knowledge about the design, conduct and analysis of clinical trial methodologies. Members include physicians, nurses, data managers, programmers, statisticians, coordinators, epidemiologists, policy experts, ethicists, regulators and others who identify themselves as "trialists."

 

At the annual meeting, an award for "Trial of the Year" will also be given. This year's winner was a trial to reduce neonatal mortality rates and maternal depression in very poor communities in eastern India.

 

"This was an extraordinary, high-quality randomized clinical trial, conducted in a very difficult setting, and achieving dramatic results of great public health importance," says Chappell. Neonatal mortality was reduced by 45 percent and maternal depression by 57 percent.



Date Published: 05/18/2011

News tag(s):  researchfacultycancer

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Last updated: 05/19/2011
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